Prepare for the unexpected with accident insurance

Accidents can happen anytime, anywhere

If you experience a covered accident or injury, accident insurance from Colonial Life provides a lump-sum benefit that can be used to help you pay for out-of-pocket expenses, such as doctor bills, co-pays or emergency room fees.

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How Colonial Life accident insurance works

When an accident happens, the last thing you want to think about is how you’re going to pay the bills. Accident insurance helps you pay for the medical and out-of-pocket costs that you may have after an accidental injury. Based on your policy, this can include emergency treatment, hospital stays, medical exams and other expenses like transportation and lodging. 

Accident insurance policies can provide you with a lump sum paid directly to you that will help pay for a wide range of situations, including initial care, surgery, transportation and lodging, and follow-up care. Here’s how it works:

  • A set amount is payable based on the injury you suffer and the treatment you receive.
  • Benefits are payable directly to you (unless you specify otherwise) and can be used as you see fit.
  • Coverage is available for you, your spouse and eligible dependent children.
  • You do not need to answer medical questions or have a physical exam to get basic coverage.
  • Accident insurance covers injuries that happen on the job or off the job, unlike workers’ compensation, which only covers on-the-job injuries.
  • Benefit payments are not reduced by any other insurance you may have with other companies.

Costs, eligibility and waiting periods before benefits are disbursed vary, so talk with your Colonial Life benefits counselor to learn more.


The average bill for an emergency room visit is $1,349.1



Out-of-pocket medical costs add up

Breathe easy with accident insurance for whatever life throws your way

If you suffer from a fracture, dislocation or other covered accidental injury, accident insurance can help offset unexpected medical expenses that aren’t covered by your medical insurance. Depending on your policy, accident insurance can help cover expenses resulting from your covered accident like:

  • Emergency room visits, X-rays, diagnostic exams, physical therapy and follow-up treatment
  • Ambulance or air ambulance to a hospital
  • Hospital stays, travel or lodging expenses related to your accident

Talk with your Colonial Life benefits counselor to learn how accident insurance can help you be prepared for the unexpected and protect what you’ve worked so hard to build.

Examples of how accident insurance can help

The Taylors: injured ankle

The Taylors' teenage daughter, Hannah, dislocated her ankle falling off her bike. Some of the accident follow-up treatment wasn't covered by insurance. Her accident benefit helped cover these, plus costs for X-rays, crutches and follow-up treatment.

James: broken ribs

James is 30, single, likes to read and enjoys movies. On his way to the bookstore, he was in a car accident and broke two of his ribs. James’s benefit helped cover his out-of-pocket costs for emergency room treatment. He also used some of his benefit to rent a car while his was in the shop.

Greg and Lisa: broken collarbone

Greg and Lisa love to go camping. One night, Greg tripped over the logs for their campfire and broke his collarbone. He used his benefit to cover his yearly deductible and co-pays for the surgery, hospital stay and physical therapy.

The examples above are for illustrative purposes only. Benefits may vary. The certificate and policy have exclusions and limitations. For complete details, see your benefits counselor.

Employers and HR representatives

Find out more about offering Colonial Life individual or group accident insurance for your employees.

Commonly asked questions about accident insurance

THIS IS A LIMITED POLICY.

1. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, “National Health Care Expenses in the U.S. Civilian Noninstitutionalized Population, 2010: Statistical Brief #396” (2013).The most recent source of its kind.